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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Vertical Highways’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Vertical Highways, 2021
Installation view
FIAC/Hors les Murs, Jardin des Tuileries, Paris

Three outdoor sculptures by the artist are installed at FIAC/Hors les Murs in the Jardin des Tuileries. This collaboration between FIAC and the Musée du Louvre is on view from 19 - 24 October. Sculptures from the series Vertical Highways were shown for the first time at Bettina Pousttchi's solo exhibition at the Berlinische Galerie - Museum of Modern Art Berlin in 2019/2020. The artist makes the sculptures from crash barriers, which she mechanically deforms and joins together to form upright works. The anthropomorphic features and the monochrome colors merge the individual parts into a coherent new form. The vertical orientation of the normally horizontally crash barriers changes the usual spatial order and gives the sculptures an architectural reference. In the sequential use of the inceptive object lies a conceptual connection to Minimal Art and also a reference to the Readymades of Marcel Duchamp.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Vertical Highways A17’, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Vertical Highways A17, 2021
Crash barriers, steel, unique
225 (h) x 95 x 77 cm
88½ (h) x 37½ x 30¼ in

The artist creates the sculptures from crash barriers, which she mechanically deforms and joins together to form upright works. The anthropomorphic features and the monochrome colors merge the individual parts into a coherent new form. The vertical orientation of the normally horizontally crash barriers changes the usual spatial order and gives the sculptures an architectural reference. In the sequential use of the inceptive object lies a conceptual connection to Minimal Art and also a reference to the Readymades of Marcel Duchamp.

The work is suitable for outdoors.
3/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Vertical Highways A21’, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Vertical Highways A21, 2021
Crash barriers, steel, unique
230 (h) x 90 x 105 cm
90½ (h) x 35½ x 41¼ in

The artist creates the sculptures from crash barriers, which she mechanically deforms and joins together to form upright works. The anthropomorphic features and the monochrome colors merge the individual parts into a coherent new form. The vertical orientation of the normally horizontally crash barriers changes the usual spatial order and gives the sculptures an architectural reference. In the sequential use of the inceptive object lies a conceptual connection to Minimal Art and also a reference to the Readymades of Marcel Duchamp.

The work is suitable for outdoors.
4/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Vertical Highways A14’, 2020
Bettina Pousttchi
Vertical Highways A14, 2020
Crash barriers, steel, unique
227 (h) x 120 x 71 cm
89¼ (h) x 47¼ x 28 in

The sculpture adds a deeper insight into the artist’s interest in structures of public space. The crash barriers used here demarcate public space and regulate movement and yet often are unnoticed. Bettina Pousttchi mechanically deformed the individual parts one by one and arranged them into a single sculptural unit. Even in the altered form the functional objects remain recognizable, while clearly betraying the forces brought to bear on the material.

The fluid form lends the sculpture an anthropomorphic trait and the monochrome surface blends the separate parts into a cohesive form. The vertical positioning of the normally horizontally placed elements provokes a shift in our spatial experience and underlines the referential role of architecture in the artist’s work.

The work is suitable for outdoors.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Directions’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Directions, 2021
Installation view
Buchmann Galerie
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Directions 09’, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Directions 09, 2021
Steel, coated
160 (h) x 130 x 4 cm
63 (h) x 51¼ x 1½ in

'Directions' are wall reliefs based on photographs the artist took of road markings. The templates of street arrows are collaged in bundle-like forms, cut in steel, and then colored. With their clear, sharp-edged shape the cut-out objects seem to float on the wall and makes them oscillate between pictogram and graffiti. Taking the structures used to establish order in public space, these works address crowd control, the directing of crowds, a theme that is more topical than ever at present.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Directions 08’, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Directions 08, 2021
Steel, coated
140 (h) x 106 x 4 cm
55 (h) x 41¾ x 1½ in

'Directions' are wall reliefs based on photographs the artist took of road markings. The templates of street arrows are collaged in bundle-like forms, cut in steel, and then colored. With their clear, sharp-edged shape the cut-out objects seem to float on the wall and makes them oscillate between pictogram and graffiti. Taking the structures used to establish order in public space, these works address crowd control, the directing of crowds, a theme that is more topical than ever at present.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Directions 06’, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Directions 06, 2021
Steel, coated
150 (h) x 70 x 4 cm
59 (h) x 27½ x 1½ in

'Directions' are wall reliefs based on photographs the artist took of road markings. The templates of street arrows are collaged in bundle-like forms, cut in steel, and then colored. With their clear, sharp-edged shape the cut-out objects seem to float on the wall and makes them oscillate between pictogram and graffiti. Taking the structures used to establish order in public space, these works address crowd control, the directing of crowds, a theme that is more topical than ever at present.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Fluidity, Arp Museum’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2022
Bettina Pousttchi
Fluidity, Arp Museum, 2022
Installation view
10/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Fluidity, Arp Museum’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2022
Bettina Pousttchi
Fluidity, Arp Museum, 2022
Installation view
11/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Greta’, 2019
Bettina Pousttchi
Greta, 2019
Tree protection barriers, stainless steel
131 (h) x 110 x 72 cm
51½ (h) x 43¼ x 28¼ in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘David’, 2019
Bettina Pousttchi
David, 2019
Tree protection barriers, stainless steel
138 (h) x 132 x 65 cm
54¼ (h) x 52 x 25½ in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Käthe’, 2018
Bettina Pousttchi
Käthe, 2018
Tree protection barriers, stainless steel
148 (h) x 68 x 104 cm
58¼ (h) x 26¾ x 41 in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Felix’, 2018
Bettina Pousttchi
Felix, 2018
Bike staple polished stainless steel
108 (h) x 115 x 140 cm
42½ (h) x 45¼ x 55 in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Tom’, 2018
Bettina Pousttchi
Tom, 2018
Street bollards stainless steel
89 (h) x 34 x 34 cm
35 (h) x 13½ x 13½ in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Amplifier’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2021
Bettina Pousttchi
Amplifier, 2021
Installation view
Konzerthaus Berlin

Amplifier draws on Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s architecture of the Berlin Concert Hall. A frontal view of the portico reveals five photographically printed columns between the six familiar Ionic columns. Unlike the historic columns, they extend beyond the first pediment, leading directly to the portico’s higher second pediment. By altering the familiar dimensions, the installation changes the perception of the building, creating a new experience of its own.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Berlin Window, Photo installation, Berlinische Galerie, Museum of Modern Art, Berlin, 2019–2020’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie
Bettina Pousttchi
Berlin Window, Photo installation, Berlinische Galerie, Museum of Modern Art, Berlin, 2019–2020
Installation view
18/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘In Recent Years, Berlinische Galerie – Museum for Modern Art Berlin’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2019
Bettina Pousttchi
In Recent Years, Berlinische Galerie – Museum for Modern Art Berlin, 2019
Installation view
19/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘In Recent Years, Berlinische Galerie – Museum for Modern Art Berlin’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2019
Bettina Pousttchi
In Recent Years, Berlinische Galerie – Museum for Modern Art Berlin, 2019
Installation view
20/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Hong Kong Time’, 2011
Bettina Pousttchi
Hong Kong Time, 2011
C-Print
120 x 150 cm
47¼ x 59 in

Bettina Pousttchi has often contemplated systems of time and space in her art. Between 2008 and 2016, she traveled around the globe to make World Time Clock, a series of twenty-four photographs taken in twenty-four different time zones. In each location, the artist captured a picture of a public clock at the same local moment: five minutes before two in the afternoon. Representing places as far-flung as Mexico City, Bangkok, and Tashkent, the images together suggest what the artist calls an “imaginary global synchronism.” The series also charts the reach of colonial power, showing, for example, how imitations of London’s iconic Big Ben denote the public time in faraway places like Mumbai, Sydney, and Cape Town. (Taken from the website of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC)
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Los Angeles Time’, 2011
Bettina Pousttchi
Los Angeles Time, 2011
C-Print
120 x 150 cm
47¼ x 59 in

Bettina Pousttchi has often contemplated systems of time and space in her art. Between 2008 and 2016, she traveled around the globe to make World Time Clock, a series of twenty-four photographs taken in twenty-four different time zones. In each location, the artist captured a picture of a public clock at the same local moment: five minutes before two in the afternoon. Representing places as far-flung as Mexico City, Bangkok, and Tashkent, the images together suggest what the artist calls an “imaginary global synchronism.” The series also charts the reach of colonial power, showing, for example, how imitations of London’s iconic Big Ben denote the public time in faraway places like Mumbai, Sydney, and Cape Town. (Taken from the website of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC)
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Moscow Time’, 2012
Bettina Pousttchi
Moscow Time, 2012
C-Print
120 x 150 cm
47¼ x 59 in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘World Time Clock, The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2016–2017
Bettina Pousttchi
World Time Clock, The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C., 2016–2017
Installation view
24 photographs
each 180 x 225 cm
70¾ x 88½ in
24/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘UNN (United Nations Nuremberg), Neues Museum Nürnberg’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2018
Bettina Pousttchi
UNN (United Nations Nuremberg), Neues Museum Nürnberg, 2018
Installation view
25/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Untitled’
Bettina Pousttchi
Untitled
Archival pigment print, edition of 20
37,5 x 55,5 cm
14¾ x 21¾ in

This edition is a detail of the work ‘UNN (United Nations Nuremberg', a pavilion in front of the New Museum Nuremberg in 2018.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Untitled’, 2016
Bettina Pousttchi
Untitled, 2016
Archival pigment print, Edition of 12
42 x 59,5 cm
16½ x 23½ in
27/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2016
Bettina Pousttchi
The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C., 2016
Installation view
28/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Drive Thru Museum, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2014
Bettina Pousttchi
Drive Thru Museum, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, 2014
Installation view
29/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Suspended Mies, The Arts Club of Chicago’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2017
Bettina Pousttchi
Suspended Mies, The Arts Club of Chicago, 2017
Installation view
30/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Sleeping Empire, Sprengel Museum Hannover’, 2015
Bettina Pousttchi
Sleeping Empire, Sprengel Museum Hannover, 2015
Photograph on textile
1700 x 480 cm
669¼ x 189 in
31/38
Bettina Pousttchi, ‘The City, City Art Museum Wolfsburg, Photo installation on the facade of Wolfsburg Castle’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2014
Bettina Pousttchi
The City, City Art Museum Wolfsburg, Photo installation on the facade of Wolfsburg Castle, 2014
Installation view
35 x 77,5 m / 114 ¾ x 254 ¼ ft
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Kunsthalle Mainz’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2018
Bettina Pousttchi
Kunsthalle Mainz, 2018
Installation view
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Houses’, 2017
Bettina Pousttchi
Houses, 2017
Fired and glazed clay, steel
113 (h) x 160 x 120 cm
44½ (h) x 63 x 47¼ in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Framework’, 2018
Bettina Pousttchi
Framework, 2018
Fired and glazed clay
157 (h) x 118 x 5,5 cm
61¾ (h) x 46½ x 2¼ in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Framework’, 2016
Bettina Pousttchi
Framework, 2016
Fired and glazed clay
119 (h) x 194 x 5,5 cm
46¾ (h) x 76½ x 2¼ in
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Framework’, 2017
Bettina Pousttchi
Framework, 2017
Fired and glazed clay
77 (h) x 77 x 5,5 cm
30¼ (h) x 30¼ x 2¼ in

Framework combines the architectural language of the European cultural space with that of the Middle East. This interweaving of perspectives is based on a transnational idea that is central to the artist’s work. The serial, non-hierarchical arrangement of almost identical modules is reminiscent of Carl Andre or Donald Judd but also evokes a multitude of cultural, historical, and autobiographical associations.
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Framework, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, Photo installation in the rotunda’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2012
Bettina Pousttchi
Framework, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, Photo installation in the rotunda, 2012
Installation view
7,5 x 42 m / 24 ½ x 137 ¾ ft
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Bettina Pousttchi, ‘Echo Berlin, Temporäre Kunsthalle Berlin’, Installation view, Buchmann Galerie, 2009
Bettina Pousttchi
Echo Berlin, Temporäre Kunsthalle Berlin, 2009
Installation view
970 paper posters on the facade of Temporaere Kunsthalle Berlin
11 x 20 x 57 m / 36 x 65 ½ x 187 ft